leisure 10.5.16

Bookland
Every Person in New York

We're midway through the first week of our month-long MUG 25 campaign—to get us to our 25th year beginning in 2017.

We're making good progress and that's crucial because we accept no advertising, no pay-to-play of any kind, which means we rely solely on contributions from you.

Today's goal is to hit the 20% mark of $5,000. Can you help us get there?







The Red Car, the new novel by Marcy Dermansky, author of Bad Marie, is out next week. It's the story of a woman in Queens who inherits a classic symbol of the midlife crisis and turns it into a funny and moving journey of (re)discovery.




Connie Willis, the great sci-fi writer, conjures a world where partners can go for an outpatient procedure that enhances their connection—sort of like Ecstasy for romantic arousal—in her new book Crosstalk.




Time Travel is James Gleick's look at the appeal of this literary notion, well beyond the 'would you go back and kill Hitler?' late-night thought experiment.




Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race, by Margot Lee Shetterly, is every bit as inspiring as the title promises.




William B. Helmreich, who has walked every block in all of New York City for his book The New York Nobody Knows, has walked Brooklyn again for The Brooklyn Nobody Knows.




A Man Booker finalist, All That Man Is by David Szalay is a novel of stories about nine European men, and the states they're in.




Since most of us won't ever get the chance to sit in a room with Notorious R.B.G., My Own Words makes for the next best thing.




The Mothers is the debut novel by Brit Bennett and it's picking up buzz for its finely written contemporary tale of a black woman, the choices she makes and the echoes they create.




His Bloody Project: Documents Relating to the Case of Roderick Macrae, by Graeme Macrae Burnet, another Man Booker short lister, is set in a middle-of-nowhere Scottish farming community in 1869, a crime novel that reads as true crime.







Jason Polan started Every Person in New York in March of 2008. He plans on working on the project until it is finished. Look for more at Jason's site and his book Every Person in New York.


Eldridge Street (from 2014)

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