intersection 07.13.11

Cool Design
Walking Off the Big Apple


Rob Forbes, the founder of Design Within Reach, brings the Northern European bike-design vibe to his fledgling Public line of wheels.




Kartell brings some shimmery fun to the humble food and drink carrier, which they've dubbed the Dune Tray.




On a Dune Tray or not, Float Glassware, handmade in the Czech Republic, looks gorgeous.




We've been fans for years (along with zillions of others)
of Grace Bonney's site Design*Sponge.
Her book, Design*Sponge at Home,
is out in September.





The Hit List, for Mac and iOS, is easily the best designed software we've ever used. It's a task manager that manages to make tasks nearly a pleasure. The developer isn't speedy or the world's best communicator, but, man, can he design.




Another kind of organizational tool, the i/o Desk Organizer is by Kaiju Studios. They're producing a short run of the piece.




We think this Danish Armchair from the 1950s, attributed to Nanna Ditzel, rocks (though it doesn't rock). It's a bit like the Womb Chair,
only in its Sunday best.




Winterhouse, which sounds perfectly Brontë, is actually one of the first modern houses in the country. Built in 1931 in northwestern Connecticut by Ezra Winter, it is an absolute beauty. And it's for sale.
[Photo: Albert Vecerka]




You can't buy the Harry Potter Criterion Collection—it was a senior project by Cooper Union student Patrick Sullivan.
But what a superb design job!
[Via: Movie City News]






Check out MUG's new blog mugshots!











Cultural and literary notes, plus self-guided walks, courtesy of Walking Off the Big Apple, a strolling guide to New York City.


The View from Hell's Kitchen


A weekend visit to the Hell's Kitchen Flea Market on West 39th Street between 9th and 10th Avenues often turns up a lot of great finds, but surely the unusual view of the city from this block and adjacent streets must be counted as one of the best side benefits to market shopping.

To the immediate northwest, the tall and sleek modern residential high-rises near the Hudson River symbolize the transformation of this once rough-and-tumble west side neighborhood into what the AIA Guide to New York City describes as "a new frontier for desperate affluent luxury invaders." To the northeast, the eclectic Midtown West/Times Square skyline rises above tenement buildings, a mix of the old and new city. From this angle in Hell's Kitchen, the steel-rod curtain of the Times Tower on Eighth Avenue, designed by Renzo Piano and built in 2007, seems the most dominant, though a magnificent older skyscraper on 42nd Street, Raymond Hood's blue-green McGraw Hill Building from 1930-1931, achieves greater elegance. Sandwiched between the two and closer to the ground, the showy Paramount Building (1926-1927) with its theatrical clock and globe looks the most fun.
[Continued]


Forty-Second Street

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